Can you FREEZE Eggs? Yes, and it can save you money!

Can you freeze eggs? YES you can! Here is a post on how to properly freeze eggs to use later.

The question of the day is — Can you freeze eggs?

Yes you can! And they taste darn near the same after they have thawed too. You can fry them, bake with them or add them to casseroles or other recipes even after they have been frozen and thawed.

I know… your mind is blown, right? :)

Can you freeze eggs? YES you can! Here is a post on how to properly freeze eggs to use later.

As many of you know I have 4 dear little backyard chickens in my suburban backyard. I usually get 3-4 eggs every day. Some weeks that many eggs for my family is not enough and I have to supplement by buying more at the store. But other times when we haven’t been using them as much they can collect rather quickly and fill all my containers. I often will give the extras away and never seem to have anyone turn them away. :)  But if I want to save money I know I can freeze the eggs to use later.

This is a fantastic way to stock up on eggs when they are on sale, or a great idea to use them up when you have a lot about to expire too.  When you see those sales on eggs..have no fear. Now you can go crazy. So easy AND practical! Doing this can save you money.

How to Freeze Eggs

Can you freeze eggs? YES you can! Here is a post on how to properly freeze eggs to use later.

I like to crack the eggs into a muffin tin, plastic egg crate or even ice cube trays. You just crack the eggs in without using any kind of spray or oils.

Freezing Eggs to use later can save you money

Then place the tray into the freezer and freeze until the eggs are frozen solid. Once they are frozen you can remove the eggs from the container.

Freezing Eggs Frozen Egg Cubes

 

If they are stuck tight just have the container sit in some warm water for a minute and they should pop right out.

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Then add them to a gallon sized freezer safe bag. They keep frozen for up to a year!

When you are ready to use them just take out the number of eggs needed and allow to thaw at room temperature.
You can use them with any recipe that requires a whole egg such as baking, breading chicken, scrambled eggs, french toast, etc.

One thing I will tell you though is that is becomes really difficult to separate eggs once they have been frozen. So if you think your recipes will require only egg whites or egg yolks then consider freezing them already separated. You can crack your egg and separate the white into one ice cube spot and the yolk in another spot.

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Then after they are frozen add them to separate freezer safe bags.

So in conclusion..to answer this question “Can you Freeze Eggs?” The answer is YES, YES YES! Please do. It’s so easy it should be a crime.41 Comments

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Comments

  1. Thank you for this post. I had this question arise a couple days ago and I didn’t have an answer! How timely. Have some freezing work to do this weekend.

  2. Thank you for sharing this! I go through a lot of eggs, and this is a great way to stock up and make them last. Thank you.

  3. Really cool – thanks for sharing this wonderful tip!

  4. Fantastic! Is that a reusable freezer bag I see? What brand?

  5. This. Is. AWESOME!!!!! Thank you for this post!

  6. Freezing your eggs is great if you are storing them up to a year. There are other ways to store fresh eggs for months. The eggs you buy at the store are typically 3 weeks to 3 months out of the chicken when you bring them home and that includes the supposed organic eggs you find in the store. I remember my great grandmother just kept her fresh eggs on the kitchen counter and growing up my friend in high school, his parents raised chickens and they just stored their eggs in a storeroom beside the chicken house at room temp unwashed and they had about 200-300 birds and sold them locally. You can store fresh eggs in a cool basement on the shelf for a few months with no problem. Refrigerated you can store them for up to 9 months. Mother Earth did a long term experiment back in 1977 testing various different methods of storing eggs. You can also just ask an old farmer or older family member how they store(d) their eggs. You will get all kinds of responses. Quality will decrease once you do refrigerate your fresh eggs and the longer they are stored and never chill them and then try to store them at room temp. Shelf life will depend on lots of things and can be affected by washing your eggs because that removes the bloom which protects your egg from bacteria. Always use an egg wash to clean your eggs which will replace the natural bloom with another protective cover or store them unwashed and wash as you use them. All of this information can be found on your own on the Internet which is where I found all the info I use to raise our little backyard flock of 4 Easter Eggers. We started raising ours after reading about you doing it Karrie and are grateful that we did. It has been a great experience raising our girls from day old chicks and now reaping the benefit of their glorious eggs.

  7. I once had many extra eggs so I put a dozen (in a cardboard egg container) in the freezer. A few weeks later, I thawed them in the fridge and they were COMPLETELY normal–as if they had never been frozen. Try it with one egg–I was shocked.

  8. Awesome!!

  9. Here is a great link for all the ways you can freeze eggs: http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/eggcyclopedia/f/freezing-eggs

    To avoid gelatinous yolks I scramble and add salt (and pepper and cauliflower puree). Then I freeze the eggs in old 4 cup yogurt tubs. Each container holds the right amount for a meal with scrambled eggs for my family.

    Freezing is also great for camping. No worry about broken eggs in travel and they thaw (or thaw enough) for use after a day or two.

  10. I have frozen both egg yolks and egg whites. The whites thawed great and were normal but my yolks gelled up. I added salt and scrambled the yolks like a lot of websites said and I they still were so gelatinous that I couldn’t use them. Everything I read said you couldn’t freeze the whole egg together but it looks like it works great for you. Do you have any problems with the yolk becoming gelatinous?

  11. Do the egg whites beat stiff after being frozen?

    • Oooh…gonna test that tomorrow morning by making homemade waffles –>http://happymoneysaver.com/sweet-milk-homemade-waffles-recipe/. I will update you soon!ate you soon!

  12. thank you for sharing this Karrie! I had no idea you could freeze eggs. I will stocking up on eggs now when they are on sale.

  13. Wow….I never knew. Typically I have fried the eggs or hard boiled and THEN frozen them….but this is genius! I will definitely be stocking up when they go on sale now.

  14. You wanna know what, I was just asking myself this last week. I was thinking about getting chickens and how many and wanted to know if it was possible to freeze eggs. Do you have chickens? If so, how many eggs does one chicken lay per day? Thanks a bunch! Love the site! :)

  15. Hmm … why do you have to crack the eggs … if the yolk and eggwhite can be frozen, why not just chuck the whole egg shell and all in the freezer and let thaw when needed?

  16. No more running out of eggs while on a baking frenzy during a snowstorm!!!!!

  17. just had to share this with you.The best way to freeze the eggs is to use silicone cupcake cups-just great. I tried quite a few containers , like ice cube trays and had a hard time getting frozen eggs out. to use the silicone cups after the eggs freeze-just turn them inside out and the eggs pop out. I can do a dozen at a time, laying them in a cake pan. I bought them at Walmart 6/$1.98. I sure hope this helps someone. I think this is the best tip I know—next to freezing eggs.

  18. Is there are reason not to freeze them in the shells?

    • Happy.MoneySaver says:

      I have read that if you freeze raw eggs in their shell, the water in the egg can expand creating small cracks in the shell letting bacteria contaminate the egg. If the egg freezes without any cracks it is said to be edible. :)

  19. So, here is what I am wondering…. Do you know if this effects the nutrients of the eggs? I know that they are delicate when it comes to heat, but wonder about very cold temperatures. Would really love to know, because this is such a helpful idea.
    Thank you!

  20. Hi. I followed this tip and upon defrosting, my yolks were firm like they had been cooked (even at room temp). There was no mention of this happening in the post that I could see. How do you work around this? I put them in my blender to puree and am hoping the muffins I am baking will work out.

  21. Hi there, just wanted to mention, I enjoyed this article.

    It was inspiring. Keep on posting!

  22. Susan M. says:

    Hi Karrie!
    I’m pretty new to your site. This was a really helpful article. I’ve become interested in homesteading, etc., and considering raising chickens, especially for the eggs. I’ve wondered about storing eggs, how long they last, etc. I never knew you could FREEZE eggs, let alone store them at room temp! I’ve also been reading about selecting chickens, and which ones are “broody”. Sounds like choosing ones that are not “broody” is the way to go. In the description of being “broody”, it would seem that may be the chicken version of “PMS.” lol Anyway….thanks for the great info on eggs. I do have a question though. I bought some fresh eggs from a local farmer about the middle of last summer (2013), are they still good (as in edible)? I’ve kept them in the fridge. It was my first time buying fresh eggs, rather than store bought. Thanks!

    P.S. I live in Kennewick (WA).

    • Hello Susan, welcome to my site! As for your question about the eggs, I wouldn’t eat them — I think the longest in the fridge should be around 4-5 months. It would lose a lot of the nutritional value much longer after that..and possibly make you sick.

  23. I am definitely trying this. My girls are laying like crazy! It’s becoming a joke that no one can visit our house without taking a dozen eggs home with them.
    To Susan M, I doubt I’d eat those old eggs either but the best trick to find out if an egg is good or bad is to place it in a bowl of water…if it sinks, it’s fine. If it floats, it’s bad…toss it out.
    Years ago, back before the airline regulations were tightened, my mom would bring a carry on full of fresh eggs home with her when she visited at Christmas. She was still eating our eggs at Easter although she did check each one before she ate it.
    Freezing eggs seems like a great way to have eggs in the winter when the girls take a break and the egg production drops. Thanks Karrie!

  24. Pam Winterrowd says:

    Good info to know….especially since I have MANY freezer containers with 6 eggs in each one already in my freezer. ha. We have less than 15 hens, and at one point I was being overrun with fresh eggs, but I hated to give them all away; so I froze them in groups of 6—perfect for my cream cheese pound cake recipe.

  25. Just wondering what type of freezer bags you are using and if you like them.

  26. T, Cunningham says:

    I had many grocery items for the freezer and some of my items in the bottom part of my fridge froze about seven of my eggs I have in an egg tray and four more in a new carton of eggs I had bought early in the week…When I went to fill my egg container they were stuck as they had cracked….all I said was oh no did I buy them that way as I always check for cracked eggs…..then as I got the new package there were more stuck in the cardboard container….seeing as I tried to pull them out the shell was stuck and the eggs looked frozen…….needing them for baking that week…I decided to put them in a bowl and use them quickly, I tried to wash off the moisture of ice on them, before I put them in the bowl …..two days later they all looked foomy ant I was sad to do this but put them down the drain……thanks for your advise but for me its too late to have kept them….Thank you …T. Cunningham

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